Opera: X Shared memory extension is not available. ZPixmap not supported

It fell out of the skies today that Opera suddenly wouldn’t load any pages, not even feeds. I ran it from command line and got this not very verbose message:

Opera: X Shared memory extension is not available. ZPixmap not supported

So to find anything useful I had to start Firefox… ;) I did find something not via google but rather right at the source at opera forums. That got me started. I tested if that was the problem by adding the suggested line to /etc/X11/xorg.conf (not without backing up the config file!) and restarted X before installing the brand new driver version as suggested.

X Shared memory extension seams to be available now — no more error message at start up. But still Opera doesn’t load any web content.

Than I moved the preferences folder to a backup location for testing. Now Opera seams to work fine. But what use if all my preferences are lost?!? Anyway, since I don’t have the time to dig in deeper and I cannot find anything on Opera’s forum on this issue I might as well just copy the important preference files over to the “fresh install” and change the rest of my settings manually. After all it’s always a good idea to start over once in a while…

Ressources:

Compile Spicebird lastest trunk from Subversion (pre 0.7) on Ubuntu Linux (Hardy)

Spicebird blogs publishedWhat you need to do to get the cutting edge of Spicebird (I wanted to try out the upcoming “blog” feature) is, if you haven’t done any gimmi-the-source-luke-compile-yourself-ing yet, quite a bit. I’ll list it one by one:

  1. Get Spicebird’s sources via subversion (I used subclipse in Aptana but command line shouldn’t be any different in effect)
  2. Since Spicebird builds on mozilla code base just like Thunderbird one needs to get the compatible Mozilla source code. The table in that wiki tells you really what you need (the linked tar ball is the one). I was new to Mozilla coding/compiling so I got a little confused. Subversion told me I had gotten “revision 763″ so that matches “702 and above” :)
  3. Get all Mozilla dependencies which are quite a bit since I like to use aptitude over apt-get but aptitude doesn’t know the build-dep command here is the full command line including with the list of (Ubuntu) packages I needed:
    sudo aptitude install autoconf2.13 cdbs diffstat fdupes intltool libart-2.0-dev libatk1.0-dev libaudiofile-dev libavahi-client-dev libavahi-common-dev libavahi-glib-dev libbonobo2-dev libbonoboui2-dev libcairo2-dev libdbus-1-dev libdbus-glib-1-dev  libesd0-dev libexpat1-dev libfontconfig1-dev libfreetype6-dev libgail-dev libgconf2-dev libgcrypt11-dev libglade2-dev  libglib2.0-dev libgnome-keyring-dev libgnome2-dev libgnomecanvas2-dev libgnomeui-dev libgnomevfs2-dev libgnutls-dev  libgnutlsxx13 libgpg-error-dev libgtk2.0-dev libhunspell-dev libice-dev libidl-dev libjpeg62-dev liblzo2-dev libnspr4-dev  libnss3-dev libopencdk10-dev liborbit2-dev libpango1.0-dev libpixman-1-dev libpng12-dev libpopt-dev libpthread-stubs0  libpthread-stubs0-dev libselinux1-dev libsepol1-dev libsm-dev libtasn1-3-dev libx11-dev libxau-dev libxcb-xlib0-dev  libxcb1-dev libxcomposite-dev libxcursor-dev libxdamage-dev libxdmcp-dev libxext-dev libxfixes-dev libxft-dev libxi-dev  libxinerama-dev libxml-xpath-perl libxml2-dev libxrandr-dev libxrender-dev libxt-dev mozilla-devscripts patchutils quilt  sharutils x11proto-composite-dev x11proto-core-dev x11proto-damage-dev x11proto-fixes-dev x11proto-input-dev x11proto-kb-dev  x11proto-randr-dev x11proto-render-dev x11proto-xext-dev x11proto-xinerama-dev xtrans-dev xulrunner-1.9-dev zlib1g-dev libdbus-glib-1-dev curl libcurl4-openssl-dev automake make build-essential cvs
    

    To double-check run sudo apt-get build-deb firefox. If you would use aptitude normally you should cancel this command (Ctrl+c) after apt-get has shown you the necessary packages. Copy-paste the list (might need manual editing to remove line breaks) to sudo aptitude install … If you would like to keep this bunch of packages only to compile spicebird run the same command after you’re done compiling but with markauto in place of install. This will remove all packages that are only installed to satisfy this build-dependency.

  4. Now you should really have everything you need. Now move spicebird’s trunk folder as “collab” into the mozilla folder.
  5. Then you need to create your .mozconfig file in your home directory. In the suggested line
    echo ". ${topsrcdir}/collab/config/mozconfig" > $HOME/.mozconfig
    

    ${topsrcdir} must be replaced by the absolute path to the newly created mozilla folder.

  6. Now everything should be set to actually compile the sources as suggested in Spicebird’s wiki. Be prepared to let it run for quite some time (> 1 hour depending on CPU speed and memory; that’s why I have time to write this post ;) ); the code uses about 500 MB disk space.

If you are interested in building a deb package have a look at inkscape’s nice walk-through. Mind you it’s written for Inkscape. See also: how to compile deb packages by hand.

Ressources

Pinning a (deb)Package systemwide for apt-get and synaptic alike

Have you ever wondered why a package pinned with, say, synaptic after a couple of days is listed to be updated when using apt-get update? There is a bug persisting at launchpad for the synaptic package. As Michael Vogt, lead developer of the apt family, suggests an easy workaround is to symlink /etc/apt/preferences to /var/lib/synaptic/preferences or vis versa. Also, the issue that when you select a package from the list to be pinned (Package -> Lock Version) the list will be emptied. After you research for that very package it will show a lock next to it (in the state column).

Reporting bugs for Ubuntu

Because I like the idea of a package, i.e. program, called from the computer the bug occurs on and automating the process of gathering relevant information I was, while using Debian, very fond of the package called reportbug in Debian. As far as I know there are three ways to report bugs found or acknowledged while using Ubuntu:

  1. For Debian sourced packages Ubuntu has reportbug, too
  2. Then there is Launchpad, a web-based reporting system that Ubuntu employ
  3. For GNOME software there is a package called bug-buddy
  4. Update: I just stumbled upon apport, Ubunuts’ own automated bug reports. I haven’t figured out yet, how to utilize it if not invoked automatically.

Even though I (so far) can not find a way to utilize apport manually for automatically launched crash reports it’s what I would expact from such a tool:

  • inform the user about the issue
  • gather relevant information
  • let the user know about what’s to be send
  • look for similar bugs in the bug tracker
  • let the user participate in the bug process, eg. subscribe to the bug

Only thing now is to find out how use it if it wasn’t launched automatically…

Update: Digging a little I can warmly recommend apport which should process crashes dumped to /var/crash automatically initiated from update-notifier. For some reason this just didn’t happen for me.

References:

How sick can this world get?

Without comments, two snippets from slashdot articles. The first one from Aug 30th:

“I ran for school board where I live this past fall and created some TV commercials including this one with a ‘Star Wars’ theme. A few months ago VH1 grabbed the commercial from YouTube and featured it in a segment of its show ‘Web Junk 2.0.’ Neither VH1 or its parent company Viacom told me they were doing this or asked my permission to use it, but I didn’t mind it if they did. I thought that Aries Spears’s commentary about it was pretty hilarious, so I posted a clip of VH1′s segment on YouTube so that I could put it on my blog. I just got an e-mail from YouTube saying that the video has been pulled because Viacom is claiming that I’m violating its copyright. Viacom used my video without permission on their commercial television show, and now says that I am infringing on their copyright for showing the clip of the work that Viacom made in violation of my own copyright!”

and the second from Sept. 03:

“California has passed a bill banning companies from requiring employees to have RFID chips surgically implanted. Already one company has been licensed by the federal government, implanting more than 2000 people. At least one other company — CityWatcher.com, a Cincinnati video surveillance company — already required RFID implants in some employees. ‘State Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto) proposed the measure after at least one company began marketing radio frequency identification devices for use in humans. “RFID is a minor miracle, with all sorts of good uses,” Simitian said. “But we shouldn’t condone forced ‘tagging’ of humans. It’s the ultimate invasion of privacy.’”

Were you ever in the desperate need to know all primes below 1000?

In Python calculating primes can be done with a one-liner using functional programming concepts lambda function, map(), reduce() and filter():

# Primes <1000
print filter(None,map(lambda y:y*reduce(lambda x,y:x*y!=0,map(lambda x,y=y: y%x, range(2,int(pow(y,0.5)+1))),1), range(2, 1000)))

To try this out on a system with python installed in a terminal/console/… type python. In the command prompt showing up paste the line, hit enter and you’ll get:
[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541, 547, 557, 563, 569, 571, 577, 587, 593, 599, 601, 607, 613, 617, 619, 631, 641, 643, 647, 653, 659, 661, 673, 677, 683, 691, 701, 709, 719, 727, 733, 739, 743, 751, 757, 761, 769, 773, 787, 797, 809, 811, 821, 823, 827, 829, 839, 853, 857, 859, 863, 877, 881, 883, 887, 907, 911, 919, 929, 937, 941, 947, 953, 967, 971, 977, 983, 991, 997]Update: Thanks to Matt and Mark the code snippet now can look much nicer:

# Primes <1000
print filter(None, map(lambda y: y*reduce(lambda x,y: x*y!=0, map(lambda x,y=y: y%x, range(2, int(pow(y, 0.5)+1))),1),range(2,1000)))

Update: Not quite as accurate (compare start of the sequence, 3 is missing) but much shorter using another formula and filter() and lambda techniques only:

filter(lambda x: x % 2 != 0 and x % 3 != 0, range(2, 1000))

[5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541, 547, 557, 563, 569, 571, 577, 587, 593, 599, 601, 607, 613, 617, 619, 631, 641, 643, 647, 653, 659, 661, 673, 677, 683, 691, 701, 709, 719, 727, 733, 739, 743, 751, 757, 761, 769, 773, 787, 797, 809, 811, 821, 823, 827, 829, 839, 853, 857, 859, 863, 877, 881, 883, 887, 907, 911, 919, 929, 937, 941, 947, 953, 967, 971, 977, 983, 991, 997]

Changing from Outlook to Thunderbird: Calender Export/Import

The best way I found to get your calender data from Outlook 2003 to Thunderbird/Lightning it via the google calendar (if you happen to not have an invitation, yet, ask me — if google still requires invitations that is). If you install the Provider for Google Calendar all you need to do is

in Outlook

  1. Export calendar data into a file (Comma Separated Values – Windows) for one year each, i.e. in the last step of the exporter 1.1.2007-31.12.2007, new export and choose 1.1.2008-31.12.2008, and so on. Be warned that repeating appointments will be saved as single items since the .csv format doesn’t allow reoccurring events.

in google calendar

  1. Create a new calendar (I called it Outlook)
  2. On the left hand side where it lists your calendars in that box choose the drop down menu (click “add”) and click “import” and import each file one by one
  3. Don’t forget to select the calendar Outlook
  4. Now go to the calendar view and, again on the left hand side, hit “Manage calendars”, select the calendar “Outlook” and at the very bottom copy the XML Link Private Address

in Thunderbird/Lightning

  1. Create a new network calendar
  2. For the google calendar location insert the copied XML link and move on
  3. Choose a different presentation colour to distiguish what is the Outlook later on
  4. You also might want to let Thunderbird save the required google-accout password

Now you have Thunderbird/Lightning showing your data from your google calendar in a different colour (mind you, it doesn’t work reliably with nightly builds of lighning, yet). You can, over time, select each calendar item, edit it and select your local calendar to save the appointment in if you prefer not to have everything (or anything) saved in google calendar.
References:

Update 2008/04/20: Yesterday I stumbled upon a very nice and promising looking cross-platform alternative called spicebird which has import for Outlook coming along already (it’s beta 0.4 now). They aim at giving a functionally complete replacement for Outlook. The software is based on Thunderbird/Lightning or Sunbird respectively. Watch a demo video or read their roadmap for more details. Some interesting ideas are:

  • Blogs as Email
  • Integration with a CMS (Drupal)
  • Document management
  • email tabs
  • Instant Messaging

Ubuntu: Get your remote Windows Desktop to shine on your Linux machine

If you’ve ever wanted to have your Windows accessed from abroad and don’t have a second Windows machine you can do so e.g. running rdesktop on a Linux machine to connect to an installation of a (Windows based) VNC Server like Tight VNC or Real VNC (both free of charge). Get instructions from ubuntuforums.org kindly written by Bazon. If I have time I might do a picture comic for Feisty since the thread is about one year old.

Update: There also is a package/front-end called Gnome-RDP that includes ssh-connectivity, too. If you’re not concerned about security it totally works by running the installer of Tight VNC on the Windows machine (just confirm every default setting, i.e. run the server as Windows background service) and use Gnome-RDP to directly connect to the IP of the Windows machine. Alternatively, it supports RDP (as the name suggests). So if the Windows machine is configured to accept remote desktop connections (see below; plus you need to “Select Remote Users…”. Get hold of the dialog by Start -> right-click “My Computer” -> Properties -> “Remote” Tab) it’s just as if you were connecting from a second MS computer. If you happen to have your windows seesion in fullscreen and want to get back to Linux hit Ctrl+Alt+Enter (Return).

Settings to accept RDP connections on Windows XP

Of course, if you leave your cosy home LAN or a likewise basically secure network, you’d need to install an ssh server on the Windows machine and let VNC only accept local connections.

Ubuntu: Enable sound with Feisty Fawn and VIA 82xx (aka AC97)

Beryl Ring Window Switcher in actionMy Fujitsu-Siemens Laptop crashed on me two days ago as I inserted a MMC Card into it’s drive as usual and WHAM! Most likely it’s the mainboard. I checked the hard drive, which is working fine. So I took the opportunity to try out Ubuntu’s Feisty Fawn Release (use torrent if you download). I have to say that’s Desktop Computing! Ubuntu was really not new to me, but still, when you actually have it on your PC it’s something else. And with Beryl and Screenlets installed (see my other post) even more fun than that Windows bunch, because, to name only one, while circling through the windows Beryl shows moving content such as videos, progress bars, etc..Anyway, after installing from the live CD, I had a fine working system, but unfortunately without sound. I rather have to say without hearing anything. The sound card was detected just fine, tools properly installed and all. So I went on investigating. First, there are a few handy commands to learn more about your hardware regarding audio:

  • List PCI devices: lspci -v | less
  • List all available sound cards play back devices: aplay -l
  • Show the mixer sound settings: amixer | less
  • Change sound settings via Gnome Volume Control: Right-click on the speaker symble in the upper right corner and choose “Open Volume Control”
  • List names of sound devices: sudo asoundconf list
  • Change sound settings via Alsa Mixer: alsamixer (move around with arrow keys, M to mute)
  • Test speakers: speaker-test or sudo aptitude install amarok ;) Or use, in GNOME, System -> Preferences -> Sound. Of course for testing any other audio player will do.

Alsamixer in action

Than I found a troubleshooting script that gave some more insight. But after playing around with the various plugs on my Fujitsu-Siemens Scaleo 600 AMD64, the PC, I found one actually working. It was the blue one, the one labeled Line-In. So not what you’d expect. Plus it only plays on the left speaker.

Update: Cracking sound problems above, say, 50% volume.

Recently I was trying to get my Hauppage WinTV running and I stumbled into sound problems again. Hearing something at all, the first issue occured as soon as volume went above about 50%. Sound was just crap. It sounded like the speakers where broken. For starters I found someone describing the same issue on the ubuntu forum. Also there are hints in the unofficial alsa wiki. Right now it sound quite well. What I did was on the one hand write the following .asoundrc file from in my home directory:

pcm.!default {
type hw
card 0
}

ctl.!default {
type hw
card 0
}

And secondly before testing in vlc via Settings -> Preferences -> Audio -> Output modules -> check “Advanced options” and change the “Audio output module” to OSS and back to ALSA after a while. But, still, only the left speaker talks per default, but on speaker-test -Dplug:front -c2 the right one plays the white noise only a little less.

Another suggestion:

If your sound is distorted, mute the IEC958 channel.

How to configure the Mic/Input channel to be the rear one?

The second was not finding the right plug at the back for line-in to bring the sound from the capture card into the sound card. If I plugged in the boxes’ cable straight into the TV card everything was just fine — except I didn’t have any other sound than the one from TV. I started off with an hydrogenaudio.org thread about the .asoundrc file. The later refers to the ability to construct virtual sound devices merging diverse sound hardware into one in the software layer. That’s interesting… but doesn’t help with my problem. On linuxforen.de I found a German guy with exactly the problem I have but unfortunately there is no solution.

Update (2007/09/16): Data from the manual

Citing the manual of my Fujitsu-Siemens PC:

Audio front panel
If you want to use the internal connection for the audio front panel for the front side of the system, then proceed as follows:

  • Remove all plug-in jumpers from the audio front panel connection.
  • Connect the cable for the audio front panel.

If you connect audio devices on both the front and the back of the system, you can only use the connections Line out and Microphone once each.

If you have connected audio devices to both Line out connections, only the connection on
the front of the system is active.

If you have connected audio devices to both Microphone connections, only the connection
on the back of the system is active.

I also found this graphic to show the basic setup and producers default meaning of the plugs:

Allocation of Sound Card Plugs

Working: Stereo Output via Rear middle plug (green, LineOut)

With the following settings I have the phenomenon that stereo output arrives at my hifi but left comes out on right box and vis versa. Also the sound for “Front Right” very quiet (tested with speaker-test -c 2 -t wav):

Simple mixer control ‘Master’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 28 [90%] [-4.50dB] [on]
Front Right: Playback 28 [90%] [-4.50dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Master Mono’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pvolume-joined pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono: Playback 26 [84%] [-7.50dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Headphone +3dB Boost’,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Headphone Amp’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘None’ ‘Front Jack’ ‘Rear Jack’
Item0: ‘Front Jack’
Simple mixer control ’3D Control – Switch’,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ’3D Control Sigmatel – Depth’,0
Capabilities: volume volume-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Capture channels: Mono
Limits: 0 – 3
Mono: 2 [67%]
Simple mixer control ‘PCM’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 28 [90%] [7.50dB] [on]
Front Right: Playback 28 [90%] [7.50dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘PCM Out Path & Mute’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘pre 3D’ ‘post 3D’
Item0: ‘post 3D’
Simple mixer control ‘Front’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 28 [90%] [-4.50dB] [on]
Front Right: Playback 28 [90%] [-4.50dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Front Jack’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Input/Disabled’ ‘Front Output’ ‘Rear Output’ ‘Center/LFE Output’ ‘Mixer Output’
Item0: ‘Mixer Output’
Simple mixer control ‘Surround’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 23 [74%] [-12.00dB] [on]
Front Right: Playback 23 [74%] [-12.00dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Surround Mix’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 23 [74%] [0.00dB] [on]
Front Right: Playback 23 [74%] [0.00dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Center’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pvolume-joined pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono: Playback 23 [74%] [-12.00dB] [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Center/LFE Jack’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Input/Disabled’ ‘Front Output’ ‘Rear Output’ ‘Center/LFE Output’ ‘Mixer Output’
Item0: ‘Mixer Output’
Simple mixer control ‘LFE’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pvolume-joined pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono: Playback 23 [74%] [-12.00dB] [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Line’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Front Left: Playback 26 [84%] [4.50dB] [on] Capture [off]
Front Right: Playback 26 [84%] [4.50dB] [on] Capture [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Line Input Source’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Mic2 Jack’ ‘Mic1 Jack’ ‘Line In Jack’ ‘Front Jack’ ‘Rear Jack’ ‘Center/LFE Jack’ ‘Mute’
Item0: ‘Rear Jack’
Simple mixer control ‘LineIn Jack’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Input/Disabled’ ‘Front Output’ ‘Rear Output’ ‘Center/LFE Output’ ‘Mixer Output’
Item0: ‘Input/Disabled’
Simple mixer control ‘CD’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Front Left: Playback 26 [84%] [4.50dB] [on] Capture [on]
Front Right: Playback 26 [84%] [4.50dB] [on] Capture [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Mic’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pvolume-joined pswitch cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Front Left: Playback 26 [84%] [4.50dB] [on] Capture [off]
Front Right: Playback 26 [84%] [4.50dB] [on] Capture [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Mic Boost (+20dB)’,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Mic Input Source’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Mic2 Jack’ ‘Mic1 Jack’ ‘Line In Jack’ ‘Front Jack’ ‘Rear Jack’ ‘Center/LFE Jack’ ‘Mute’
Item0: ‘Mic1 Jack’
Simple mixer control ‘Mic Select’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Mic1′ ‘Mic2′
Item0: ‘Mic1′
Simple mixer control ‘Mic1 Jack’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Input/Disabled’ ‘Front Output’ ‘Rear Output’ ‘Center/LFE Output’ ‘Mixer Output’
Item0: ‘Mixer Output’
Simple mixer control ‘Video’,0
Capabilities: cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Front Left: Capture [off]
Front Right: Capture [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Phone’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pvolume-joined pswitch pswitch-joined cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Playback channels: Mono
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono: Playback 5 [16%] [-27.00dB] [off]
Front Left: Capture [off]
Front Right: Capture [off]
Simple mixer control ‘IEC958′,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ‘IEC958 Output’,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ‘IEC958 Playback AC97-SPSA’,0
Capabilities: volume volume-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Capture channels: Mono
Limits: 0 – 3
Mono: 2 [67%]
Simple mixer control ‘PC Speaker’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pvolume-joined pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Limits: Playback 0 – 15
Mono: Playback 11 [73%] [-12.00dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Aux’,0
Capabilities: pvolume pswitch cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Front Left: Playback 23 [74%] [0.00dB] [off] Capture [off]
Front Right: Playback 23 [74%] [0.00dB] [off] Capture [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Mono Output Select’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Mix’ ‘Mic’
Item0: ‘Mix’
Simple mixer control ‘Capture’,0
Capabilities: cvolume cswitch
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Capture 0 – 15
Front Left: Capture 11 [73%] [16.50dB] [on]
Front Right: Capture 11 [73%] [16.50dB] [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Mix’,0
Capabilities: cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Front Left: Capture [off]
Front Right: Capture [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Mix Mono’,0
Capabilities: cswitch cswitch-exclusive
Capture exclusive group: 0
Capture channels: Front Left – Front Right
Front Left: Capture [off]
Front Right: Capture [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Exchange Center/LFE’,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ‘External Amplifier’,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [on]
Simple mixer control ‘Input Source Select’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Input1′ ‘Input2′
Item0: ‘Input1′
Simple mixer control ‘Input Source Select’,1
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Input1′ ‘Input2′
Item0: ‘Input2′
Simple mixer control ‘Rear Jack’,0
Capabilities: enum
Items: ‘Input/Disabled’ ‘Front Output’ ‘Rear Output’ ‘Center/LFE Output’ ‘Mixer Output’
Item0: ‘Front Output’
Simple mixer control ‘Sigmatel 4-Speaker Stereo’,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ‘Sigmatel Surround Phase Inversion Playback ‘,0
Capabilities: pswitch pswitch-joined
Playback channels: Mono
Mono: Playback [off]
Simple mixer control ‘VIA DXS’,0
Capabilities: pvolume
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 27 [87%] [-54.00dB]
Front Right: Playback 27 [87%] [-54.00dB]
Simple mixer control ‘VIA DXS’,1
Capabilities: pvolume
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 27 [87%] [-54.00dB]
Front Right: Playback 27 [87%] [-54.00dB]
Simple mixer control ‘VIA DXS’,2
Capabilities: pvolume
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 27 [87%] [-54.00dB]
Front Right: Playback 27 [87%] [-54.00dB]
Simple mixer control ‘VIA DXS’,3
Capabilities: pvolume
Playback channels: Front Left – Front Right
Limits: Playback 0 – 31
Mono:
Front Left: Playback 28 [90%] [-52.50dB]
Front Right: Playback 28 [90%] [-52.50dB]

  • Item: Front conns loudness of both channels
  • Rear Jack [Front Output] if I change it other than to [Mixer Output] nothing can be heard. Also, if I switch to Mixer Output (via [Center/LFE Output] where it “cracks”) at first loudness of Front Right sound is about the same but becomes quieter. So maybe it’s the cable? When I turn up the volume to 100% Front Left sound keeps being ok but Front Right is distorted and a little slowed down.

Infos from alsa-base doc

In /usr/share/doc/alsa-base/driver/VIA82xx-mixer.txt it sais:

On many VIA82xx boards, the ‘Input Source Select’ mixer control does not work.
Setting it to ‘Input2′ on such boards will cause recording to hang, or fail
with EIO (input/output error) via OSS emulation. This control should be left
at ‘Input1′ for such cards.

Not quite sure what that means for me, yet.

My first Time — Impressions using Joost

unexpected wind hose on Sydney Hobart Yacht Race 1998Carlos from Flash Enabled kindly offered an invitation to joost. Since I was looking for a way to watch the AC2007 matches online with a fairly slow connection (512 kB/s) — hence looking for quality video caching — I gave it a try (I haven’t afforded a digital tv card, yet). Discovering a broadcast for those races was disappointed. Instead I was solaced with “X Force – Episode 5: The Science of Sailing“, a report on 1998th Sydney Hobart Yacht Race (630 nm).

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