Archive Audio CDs to APE (MAC) or FLAC Image Files and Toss Away Your Dust Catchers

If someone is interested in archiving your audio CD collection in a really save manner to get rid of them after the encoding, or I should say transcoding process you might want to have a look at Neil Popham’s guide. Neil Popham, by the way, wrote some features for the APEv2 tagging tool wapet. His guide utilizes Windows batch scripts, adds tags and employs PAR2 for parity information. The later is needed to overcome seldom yet possible bit failures which would compromise an ape file. The ripping is done with EAC, the meanwhile well-known audio CD accurate ripping tool by Andre Wiethoff.

Using one single image file per CD has the benefit over multiple files to include, among others, audio information from before the first track, lead-in silence and TOC information. On the other hand, for audio library handling and daily playback where tagging plays a more important role, one file per track is much more comfy. That way all tags can be written directly to the audio file. This, however is resolutely limited with cue sheets. For example, with foobar2000 it’s transparent whether you have your playlist made up from an ape image with cue sheet or from multiple audio files with tags. It’s all the same with randomizing the list, seeking forward and backwards and the like. But once it comes to playback statistics or ReplayGain this will not be written to any file besides fb2k’s library database.

For my daily usage I copied the file MAC.exe (the actual encoder) from the Monkey’s Audio directory to foobar2000’s one and set up an encoding preset in it’s converter preferences using one of the following parameter taken from hydrogenaudio:

-c1000 Fast / large file
-c2000 Normal
-c3000 High / medium file
-c4000 Extra High
-c5000 Insane / small file

Prefixed by the source and destination file variables %s %d. I mainly chose ape over flac because of ape’s flexible tagging feature and neglected the in terms of encoding far better codec OptimFROG because this one needs heaps of CPU usage for decoding (while listening). When CPU power is not a constraint any longer I will most likely switch to ofg (if at that time it still has the best compression around). Don’t forget to enable the secure mode for your CD drive in fb2k under file -> open audio cd… -> select your drive and than drive settings. You can also access the rip wizard from there. Or go via “add to playlist” and convert the tracks manually.

Update: I have found out about WavPack which IMHO is a much better choice to MAC (APE) and FLAC because of better support, tagging and hybrid mode.

2 Comments

  1. bandsxbands said,

    Tuesday, 2nd Feb 2010 at 20:28

    Technology really is an inescapable aspect of our daily lives, and I am fairly certain that we have passed the point of no return in our relationship with technology.

    I don’t mean this in a bad way, of course! Societal concerns aside… I just hope that as the price of memory drops, the possibility of copying our brains onto a digital medium becomes a true reality. It’s a fantasy that I dream about almost every day.

    (Posted on Nintendo DS running R4i DS SerVo)

  2. Moses said,

    Tuesday, 6th Jan 2009 at 20:47

    q0DEtOriglB8x


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